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Why You Should Have Marginal Plants In Your Pond

3rd Jan 2024

Why You Should Have Marginal Plants In Your Pond

Marginal plants, aptly named for their preference to grow around the edges or "margins" of the pond, bring a variety of benefits to your pond’s ecosystem. They not only break up and hide the rock work to make the pond look more natural but also serve as effective natural filters.

Thriving in wet soil or standing water, these plants are adaptable and come in a variety of shapes, textures, colours, and sizes.

These plants play a crucial role in naturalising the pond and enhancing filtration. By absorbing nutrients that would otherwise fuel algae, they contribute to the pond's ecological balance. Moreover, marginal plants offer shelter for creatures like frogs, creating a conducive environment for various wildlife. Birds find refuge, and the nectar from flowering plants attracts butterflies and other insects.

Marginal plants come in both hardy and tropical species. A strategic mix of both is akin to blending annuals and perennials in a garden. Hardy plants return season after season, gradually maturing and giving the pond a fuller look with each passing year. On the other hand, tropicals add a beautiful touch but last only one season.

Caring for marginal plants is straightforward. Regular removal of dead or excess plant material is generally enough to maintain. Fertilisation is often unnecessary as these plants draw nutrients directly from the pond. During winter we recommend pruning the plants and during Spring, clearing away dead material prepares the ground for vibrant new growth.

While water lilies and lotuses might steal the spotlight, marginal plants are the unsung heroes of a well-balanced water garden. They add texture, colour, and blooms that soften the rock face, creating a seamless transition between the pond and its surroundings. Experimenting with different varieties allows you to play with colours, textures, and heights.